Your Mental Health’s Plea: Drop the Capes of Shame

Glennon Doyle, previously known as Glennon Doyle Melton, is a #1 New York Times bestselling author and founder of the well-known Momastery.com. She is a recovering bulimic, alcoholic, and drug user. She discusses shame, life, and the bruises and epiphanies that lead us toward realizations and decisions. While I was listening to a presentation of hers from 2013, the opening statement left an impression on my heart:

“When I was eight-years-old, I started to feel exposed, and I started to feel very awkward. Every day I was pushed out of my house and into school, all oily, and pudgy, and conspicuous. And to me, the other girls seemed so cool, and together, and easy. And I started to feel like a loser in a world that preferred superheroes.”

Glennon goes on to say that she learned to wear superhero capes at a young age. And contrary to what a superhero cape suggests for modern-day culture, Glennon describes capes as the things you put over your real self, “so that our real tender selves don’t have to be seen and can’t be hurt.” Examples of capes she gives are pretending, addiction, perfectionism, overworking, snarkiness, and apathy.

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Mental Health, Domestic Violence, & COVID: A Tumultuous Trio

“Women who have experienced domestic violence or abuse are at a significantly higher risk of experiencing a range of mental health conditions including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and thoughts of suicide.” This reality is why the exit door of a domestic abuse situation isn’t the end of the healing process; it’s the start. 

Domestic abuse survivors include both men and women, and Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is another phrase used to refer to harm– physical, sexual, or psychological–

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Micronutrients: The Caped Crusader Your Body Needs

Micronutrients “…are the ‘magic wands’ that enable the body to produce enzymes, hormones, and other substances essential for proper growth and development. As tiny as the amounts are, however, the consequences of their absence are severe.” This excerpt from the James Haskell Health & Fitness portal sums up the importance of micronutrients. As the common phrase goes, good things come in small packages.

Unfortunately, “… almost 75 percent of people living in Western civilizations do not consume enough micronutrients each day to maintain their maximum health.” Spoiler alert: The rate is lower in the U.S.

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Pets: Children’s Saving Grace Both During & After COVID-19

“The researchers found that parents in dog-owning families were 30 percent less likely to report conduct and peer problems with their toddlers in comparison to families that don’t own dogs.”~ Concerned About Your Kid’s Social Development? Getting a Dog Can Help

“Researchers evaluated 643 children for signs of anxiety. They found that only 12 percent of kids who have dogs met the clinical criteria that would prompt health care professionals to further screen for anxiety… Being with dogs can lower levels of cortisol (which is associated with stress),

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Emojis, Mood Swings, & You

Have you ever looked at your frequently used emojis list on your cell phone after you’ve let a young child text emojis to someone? After the grinning and proud child hands back your phone, the emojis in the frequently used list vary from pizza to unicorns to high-heeled shoes to dinosaurs to countless other images that seem to have zero connection to each other. This is a visualization for sudden mood swings, which PsychCentral defines as “a noticeable change in one’s mood or emotional state.”

Combating Mood Changes

Unlike the jump from pizza to unicorns to high-heeled shoes to dinosaurs in the above analogy that make the child giddy with happiness,

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The Word Workaholic: Friend or Foe?

Workaholic.

This word is said to be coined by minister and psychologist Wayne Oats in 1971. And as we near the 50 year anniversary of this word’s existence, the debate continues on whether or not being dubbed a workaholic is something to be proud of or not.

Perfect Balance Is an Urban Legend

July 5th is National Workaholics Day, and it’s a day that’s meant to remind people to balance their personal and professional lives. But is perfect balance actually obtainable?

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Time is the Greatest Luxury: Don’t Let Seasonal Affective Disorder Steal It

“Winter is coming!” This Game of Thrones line sets the perfect tone for how Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is presented in late autumn. As people brace themselves for the winter months, writers show up in droves to discuss SAD and to arm readers with knowledge that may help them fight off its devastating blow.

Here’s the deal, though. Discussing SAD in late autumn isn’t nearly as impactful as discussing it when people are suffering through it. Although autumn articles on SAD may help people avoid it or deal with it to a lesser degree,

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Drugs, Fear, & Your Christmas Card List ~ There’s Hope for Those Who Suffer

Runny Nose
Vomiting
Chills
Rapid heartbeat
Anxiety & Depression
Disorientation
Excessive sweating

Watery eyes
Nausea
Muscle aches
Increased blood pressure
Irritability
Insomnia & Fatigue
Panic Attacks

Fever
Headaches
Diarrhea
Agitation
Depression
Body aches
Cravings

This is the abbreviated menu for the withdrawal symptoms associated with Kratom, Morphine, Codeine, Benzo, and Valium, among other pharmaceuticals. According to rehabs.com, “the symptoms of drug withdrawal are perhaps the worst part of the vicious cycle.

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Perfectionism: Battering Minds, Marriages, & Millenials for Decades ~ It’s Time to Let Scars Show and Missteps Lead the Way

GoodTherapy defines perfectionism as “the need to be or appear to be perfect, or even to believe that it’s possible to achieve perfection.” Medical News Today warns about socially prescribed perfectionism, which is when “individuals believe their social context is excessively demanding, that others judge them harshly, and that they must display perfection to secure approval.” Research links perfectionism to anxiety, depression, suicide (especially among college students), risk of bipolar disorder, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease and among other things,

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The Question We Ask But Aren’t Ready to Field: How are you?

The bedroom door creaks open, reminding Ava her mom is listening.

“Sweetheart,” mom says, “what’s wrong?”

“Nothing,” her ten-year-old, Ava, says through a forced smile as she walks across her room to hug her mom. “Everything is great. Can we go make pancakes?”

Ava loves her mom. For as long as Ava can remember, her mom has bent over backward to provide everything she needs. From staying up late sewing patches on her jeans to making sure every peanut butter sandwich in her lunch box is crustless and heart-shaped,

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