Teens, Stress, & Anxiety – Turning a Mess into a Masterpiece

Their cries are silent but visible.

According to a 2017 National Institute of Mental Health report, an anxiety disorder is present in 38% of female teens and 26.1% of male teens. Experienced infrequently, anxiety is a normal response to stress. The concern arises when feelings of anxiety occur more often than not throughout a six-month period. Psychologists refer to this as chronic stress. The constant presence of anxiety in teens alters the emotional and physical framework in which they previously thrived. Anxiety affects teens emotionally (irritability, outbursts), socially (isolating from peer group), physically (headaches, gastrointestinal problems, excessive fatigue, decreased immune function, obesity), sleep-wise (difficulty falling and staying asleep), academically (difficulty focusing and executing assignments), and can lead to symptoms of a panic attack (rapid heartbeats, sweating, dizziness).

Truth is, today’s teens often deal with more day-to-day stress than teens of any other generation. They struggle to find their place among cyber bullying and social media perfection. It takes one click of a mouse or tap of the finger for a negative comment to post and likewise, it’s easier than ever to manipulate photos and stories to create a false reality that leads others to feel an inferior existence.

Continued

Categories:

Lifestyle Strategies to Help Youth with Anxiety

Being a teenager means experiencing a wide range of physical, emotional and social changes, which can often make them vulnerable to anxiety. If you have a teen in your life who has experienced anxiety, you know how hard it can be to help them.

It is useful to acknowledge that anxiety is a perfectly normal reaction to stress. 

Anxiety lets us know when we’re in danger, or when something important is happening so we can perform at our best. It can help youth deal with overwhelming situations like exams,

Continued

Categories:

This diet may reduce anxiety, distress & depression

In June 2019, the peer-review journal Nutritional Neuroscience published a study by researchers in Canada and Iran that shows a connection between diet and mental health.

Continued

Categories:

Yet another reason to not drink soft drinks.

In 2017, researchers in China recruited over 8,000 university students in a study exploring links between soft drink consumption and mental health. They published the results of that study earlier this month in the peer-reviewed journal Public Health Nutrition.

Continued

Categories:

Mediterranean diet connected to lower depression risk

In March 2019, researchers in Canada and Iran published a study in the Qom University of Medical Sciences Journal, showing a connection between what we eat and our mental health.

Continued

Categories:
Promo Fridays

Truehope Newsletter

Get special discounts every other week

Who doesn't like discounts??

Sign up to our biweekly newsletter now to receive a special discount codes and take advantage of some great savings on Truehope's life-changing products!

5 dietary habits connected to depression and anxiety

in February 2019, researchers in Korea published a study in the Journal of Nutrition and Health, showing a connection between diet and mental health.

Continued

Categories:

3 diets that may reduce depression

In January 2019, researchers in Iran published a study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, showing a connection between diet and mental health.

Continued

Categories:

B vitamins may be connected to depression and anxiety

In January 2019, researchers in Ireland and the UK published a study in Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, showing a connection between B vitamin levels and mental health in older adults.

Continued

Categories:

3 foods connected to poor mental health in teen girls

In January 2019, researchers in Iran published a study in the Tehran University Medical Journal, showing a connection between diet and mental health.

Continued

Categories:

Depression and anxiety may be connected to antioxidant levels

In November 2018, researchers in Iran and Canada published a study in the journal Nutrition, showing a connection between depression and anxiety and antioxidant levels.

Continued

Categories: